People with ADHD having Seasonal Affective Disorder

By Scott Weisbrot

Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is something some people have. When the weather gets colder, people become less active and feel more unmotivated. People with ADHD are 3 times more likely to have SAD. I predict that this might be because of the change to cold weather. People with ADHD are more likely to be creative and feel elevated during the warmer weather. They may even feel pure happiness. SAD may be associated with oversleeping, fatigue, food cravings, and weight gain. It may also be linked to higher rates of loneliness, lack of interest in daily and social activities, and suicidal thoughts. This depression in the winter months is probably linked to the fact that it is too cold, and there is not much activity. Seasonal affective disorder can also be related to a lack of vitamin D, overproduction of melatonin, altered circadian rhythm, and reduced eating.

In the United Kingdom and Ireland

The facts about Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) is that the United Kingdom and Ireland has more people that are affected from this because of the gloomy days with less days of sunshine and more clouds and rain. SAD is also more common in areas around the globe that are far from the equator including Nordic Countries, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, Finland, Denmark, and even the Netherlands. Areas near the Arctic have more people with seasonal affective disorder because daylight gets short really fast and everyone is going to deal with no daylight during the winter months. Women are more likely to have SAD than men and people from the age range of 18 to 30 years are most likely to have Seasonal Affective Disorder.

There’s always help for people if they have anxiety and depression like call a hotline to talk to a professional to understand your feelings and cope with your emotions. Doing therapy is also good for people on the autism spectrum disorder or work on a hobby that you enjoy. Doing sensory activities can be great for autism people to help them stay calm and focus on their maintaining strategies. You can spend some quality time with friends and family to keep yourself in a positive mood.

seasonal affective disorder
NIMH » Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD): More Than the Winter Blues
3 Charts | Seasonal Affective Disorder: What Are The Symptoms?
5 Tips to Manage SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder) - HorizonView Health
Writing and Seasonal Affective Disorder — The Writer's Scrap Bin
Mood Disorders. - ppt download

The Websites with Helpful Tips for Seasonal Affective Disorder

References:

  1. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/seasonal-affective-disorder/symptoms-causes/syc-20364651
  2. https://www.ahealthiermichigan.org/2019/06/07/the-connection-between-seasonal-affective-disorder-and-adhd/

Edited by Elliot Gavin Keenan

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